Where the Universe Came from: How Einstein's Relativity Unlocks the Past, Present and Future of the Cosmos

Author(s): New Scientist

Popular Science

WHY GENERAL RELATIVITY LEAVES UNFINISHED BUSINESS WITH THE COSMOS A little over a century ago, a young Albert Einstein presented his general theory of relativity to the world and utterly transformed our understanding of the universe. He overturned centuries of thinking about gravity by revealing how it arises from the curvature of space and time. Yet general relativity has had far greater consequences. It has revealed how our universe has been expanding from a hot dense state called the big bang. It has changed our understanding of space and time. And it predicts that the universe is an extreme place, containing black holes and possibly wormholes. Using Einstein's insights, today's cosmologists have come to realise that most of the universe is in the form of mysterious dark energy. In WHERE THE UNIVERSE CAME FROM, leading cosmologists and New Scientist explain that we still have plenty of unfinished business with the cosmos. How does the dark universe shape our cosmic destiny? What is really happening near black holes? Are we any closer to discovering the ripples in space-time predicted by Einstein? Why is relativity not the final answer?
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Since the first magazine was published in 1956, New Scientist has established a world-beating reputation for exploring and uncovering the latest developments and discoveries in science and technology, placing them in context and exploring what they mean for the future. Each week through a variety of different channels, including print, online, social media and more, New Scientist reaches over four million highly engaged readers - over a million readers for the print magazine alone.

General Fields

  • : 9781473629592
  • : Hodder & Stoughton General Division
  • : John Murray Learning
  • : March 2017
  • : 216mm X 135mm
  • : United Kingdom
  • : March 2017
  • : books

Special Fields

  • : 224
  • : New Scientist
  • : Paperback
  • : 317
  • : 530.11